Why I (Still) Love Tech: In Defense of a Difficult Industry

Stefan Dinse/EyeEm/Getty Images (clouds) And yet I still love the big T, by which I mean either “technology” or “trillions of dollars.” Why wouldn’t I? I came to New York City at the age of 21, in the era of Java programming, when Yahoo! still deserved its exclamation point. I’d spent my childhood expecting nuclear holocaust and suddenly came out of college with a knowledge of HTML and deep beliefs about hypertext, copies of WIRED (hello) and Ray Gun bought at the near-campus Uni-Mart. The 1996 theme at Davos was “Sustaining Globalization”; the 1997 theme was “Building the Network Society.” One just naturally follows the other. I surfed the most violent tsunami of capital growth in the history of humankind. …

It’s not enough to break up Big Tech. We need to imagine a better alternative | Evgeny Morozov

Presenting tech companies as Americas greatest menace may appeal to voters, but it does little to chart an alternative future As Facebook all but pleads guilty to a severe form of data addiction, confessing its digital sins and promising to reinvent itself as a privacy-worshiping denizen of the global village, the foundations of Big Techs cultural hegemony appear to be crumbling. Most surprisingly, its in the United States, Silicon Valleys home territory, where they seem to be the weakest. Even in these times of extreme polarization, Trump, who has habitual outbursts against censorship by social media platforms, eagerly joins left-wing politicians like Elizabeth Warren and Bernie Sanders in presenting Big Tech as Americas greatest menace The recent call by Chris …