Inside Backpage.coms Vicious Battle With the Feds

Beth Holzer A few minutes before 9 am on April 6, 2018, a fleet of unmarked vehicles with government plates rolled up in front of Lacey’s multimillion-dollar compound in Paradise Valley, a few miles outside of Phoenix. These weren’t the guests he’d been expecting. The 69-year-old divorced father of two had recently gotten remarried, and he was preparing to host a lavish party to celebrate his vows. Tents were pitched on his lawn; retired journalists and overworked lawyers were winging their way into town. FBI agents informed the groom that he was being arrested on charges of money laundering and facilitating prostitution. They cuffed him, then subdued the home’s other occupants, including Lacey’s 76-year-old mother-in-law, whom they ordered out of …

It’s not enough to break up Big Tech. We need to imagine a better alternative | Evgeny Morozov

Presenting tech companies as Americas greatest menace may appeal to voters, but it does little to chart an alternative future As Facebook all but pleads guilty to a severe form of data addiction, confessing its digital sins and promising to reinvent itself as a privacy-worshiping denizen of the global village, the foundations of Big Techs cultural hegemony appear to be crumbling. Most surprisingly, its in the United States, Silicon Valleys home territory, where they seem to be the weakest. Even in these times of extreme polarization, Trump, who has habitual outbursts against censorship by social media platforms, eagerly joins left-wing politicians like Elizabeth Warren and Bernie Sanders in presenting Big Tech as Americas greatest menace The recent call by Chris …