In Defense of Mayonnaise

Mayonnaise is the internet’s favorite condiment villain. The egg, oil, and vinegar emulsion is a symbol not only for blandness, but for whiteness and all its attendant cultural appropriation and entitlement. It symbolizes the whitewashing of culture. It looks like something extruded from a teenage pimple or a long festering wound. Plus, haters love to point out, it’s terrible for you. It’s all fat! And salt! And because of the eggs, it's dangerous! If you leave a potato salad made with it out too long at your BBQ, everyone could get salmonella and then you're literally a murderer. Do you really love mayonnaise enough to murder a Fourth of July party for it? Yes, I do. And it's worse than …

The Meaning Behind the #UnwantedIvanka Meme

Ivanka Trump has become an ironic internet Carmen Sandiego. She's popped up in The Last Supper, at the Yalta Conference alongside Winston Churchill, in the opening credits of Friends, on the Abbey Road album cover, on Mount Rushmore. Sometimes, like when she's photobombing Dust Bowl migrants, she's flashing a big cheesy grin. Other times, like at President Lyndon B. Johnson's swearing in, she's more of a pensive onlooker. She is always amusing, always awkward—and always unwanted. Emma Grey Ellis #KimOhNo: Be Grateful That Kim Kardashian Is Bad at Puns Emma Grey Ellis Enter the Age of Borderless Memes Emma Grey Ellis Why You Can't Look Away From #CursedImages The people of Twitter have been Photoshopping Ivanka Trump into images of …

In Praise of Dadfluencers

All around me, I see good dads. They're kissing boo-boos at the park, rushing to pick their kids up from daycare, they're posting proud photos on Instagram and funny conversations they have with their children on Twitter and Facebook. The role of fathers in America is rapidly evolving, with millennial dads on average far more involved in daily parenting tasks than their own fathers were. Evidence of this shows up in surveys, academic research, and across the internet. Proof of good paternity is everywhere. On Instagram, dads have posted 3.7 million photos and videos to the hashtag #dadlife. (#Fatherhood has 2 million.) On Twitter, dads sharing gross, relatable, and heartwarming looks at fatherhood have amassed huge followings. Take father of …

Optimization Smackdown: Hustle Porn vs. Zen Porn

This story is part of a series on how we make time—from productivity hacks and long walks to altering the function of our own circadian clocks. Melody Wilding’s hair had started falling out. Her heart fluttered wildly in her chest even in moments of calm, and on the weekends she felt too drained to get out of bed. “I was 20 years old,” she says, “but I felt 70.” The problem wasn’t depression or disease or anything pharmaceutically fixable. It was burnout: a totalizing exhaustion created by Wildling’s self-described “typical type A, overachiever personality” and its hyperdisciplined fixation on productivity. Her mind told her to do more, but her body had had enough. The quest for self-optimization has long consumed …

Why I (Still) Love Tech: In Defense of a Difficult Industry

Stefan Dinse/EyeEm/Getty Images (clouds) And yet I still love the big T, by which I mean either “technology” or “trillions of dollars.” Why wouldn’t I? I came to New York City at the age of 21, in the era of Java programming, when Yahoo! still deserved its exclamation point. I’d spent my childhood expecting nuclear holocaust and suddenly came out of college with a knowledge of HTML and deep beliefs about hypertext, copies of WIRED (hello) and Ray Gun bought at the near-campus Uni-Mart. The 1996 theme at Davos was “Sustaining Globalization”; the 1997 theme was “Building the Network Society.” One just naturally follows the other. I surfed the most violent tsunami of capital growth in the history of humankind. …