Painted stone record attempt for cancer girl

Media playback is unsupported on your device Media captionIsla Tansey wanted people to make and share stones to help remember her The family of a seven-year-old girl who died from spinal cancer are hoping to break a world record based on her love of painted stones. Before her death last year, Isla Tansey, from Hinckley, Leicestershire, inspired people around the world to decorate and hide stones. Her family now want to set a new record for the most painted stones in a single display. The attempt will take place at a family fun day in her memory later. Her love of painted stones prompted the #islastones appeal, in which she encouraged people to paint and hide stones for others to …

Solange shines at London’s Lovebox

It’s an abstract, complex record, with none of the instant hooks of its predecessor, 2016’s A Seat At The Table. But the audience, instead of being alienated, seemed enraptured by the snaking, jazz-like arrangements, and Solange’s sunlit harmonies. Wisely, the singer peppered the set with more-recognisable songs from her back catalogue – the street funk of Losing You, and the soaring ballad Cranes In The Sky – and threaded the new record’s most memorable earworm, Things I Imagined, throughout the set as a musical motif. Skip Youtube post by SolangeKnowlesVEVO Warning: Third party content may contain adverts Report The band was crisp and clear, with a brass section that brought a fresh, New Orleans vibe to the material; highlighting Solange’s …

Pride in London marks 50 years of protest

The Red Arrows carried out a flypast at 13:25 BST. Image copyright AFP Image copyright Getty Images Image caption Actor Sir Ian McKellen marched through Piccadilly Circus Image copyright PA Media Image copyright EPA ‘Smallest Pride parade’ celebrates marches Pride in London: What do all the flags mean? Are businesses using Pride without giving back? Image copyright EPA Image copyright PA Media All pictures copyrighted.

‘My parents told everyone I was dead’

In 1980 a baby girl was given up for adoption for being the wrong colour – she was mixed-race, her parents were white, and this was apartheid South Africa. But being brought up by a white couple in the UK left her searching for her place in the world. She only found it when she returned to the country of her birth. As the plane touched down in Johannesburg, Sara-Jayne King caught her breath. More than 25 years had passed since she had last seen South Africa. She had no conscious memories of it. She had left Johannesburg as a seven-week-old infant, to be deposited by her biological mother in England. The years in between had not been easy. Sara-Jayne …

Theatre photos bring backstage world to life

Image copyright Fraser McGee/Birmingham Rep Image caption “The Rep is more than a theatre. It’s an icon of the city, with its distinctive Brutalist architecture and its role in the history of Birmingham’s arts and culture scene dating back over a century,” said Mr McGee Image copyright Fraser McGee/Birmingham Rep Image caption “The theatre is unique in the city in that it’s our only producing theatre. Thanks to an incredible team of skilled crafts people, the theatre designs and creates its own sets and costumes, which makes its productions really special” Image copyright Fraser McGee/Birmingham REP Image caption Of the 100 exhibition photographs, one of Mr McGee’s favourites is a shot of a welder in the workshop. “Taken during the …

How pop divas dominated Glastonbury’s last day

Media playback is unsupported on your device Media captionChristine and the Queens on equality in music The Cure might have been headlining the Pyramid Stage, but Glastonbury’s final day was all about envelope-pushing pop divas. Billie Eilish, Janelle Monae and Christine And The Queens played across the site, bringing with them messages of liberation, empowerment and acceptance. Monae, who headlined the West Holts stage, delivered a potent mix of sex and politics, encouraging the crowd to embrace their sexuality by declaring: “Say it loud, I’m dirty and proud”. A field away, Christine and the Queens’ Heloise Letissier was also preaching tolerance, pronouncing the Other Stage “a safe space – because if there’s no judgment, then anything can happen”. Both artists …

Stormzy tears up the stage at Glastonbury

“Culture moves the world,” Jay-Z said. “When you step on that stage, you’re going to see it because they are really ready for it.” From there, Stormzy strode onstage amid flamethrowers and fireworks, delivering an incendiary version of Know Me From. Three songs in, he flashed crime statistics on the video screens, while sampling a speech by Labour MP David Lammy on racial disproportionality in the criminal justice system. Later, the star invited a classically-trained dancer on stage to highlight how racism and privilege are present in all walks of life – even ballet, where shoes have only just became available in different skin tones. Skip Twitter post by @DavidLammy ✊🏿👊🏿 @stormzy using his headline spot at #glastonburyfestival2019 to speak …

Is your festival trip killing the planet?

Image copyright Getty Images With thousands of people making their way across the country, transport can have a huge impact on CO2 emissions. Besma suggests getting a coach, often organised by the festival company itself. Image copyright Getty Images If you’re going to a British festival, you’ll be lucky to avoid a smattering of rain. Besma says she always brings a rain mac with her rather than single use plastic ponchos. “If you do take a plastic poncho, afterwards pack it up and keep it in your bag so if it rains throughout the rest of the festival you can shove it back on. You can also sit on them, which is useful, if it gets muddy,” Besma says. Washing …

Free prom dress plea ‘hit a chord’

Media playback is unsupported on your device Media captionPupils felt uneasy about attending their school prom without a gown Three years ago Maesteg Comprehensive School held its first “prom” party for its year 11 students to celebrate finishing their GCSEs. Head teacher Helen Jones thought the new tradition imported from America was “fantastic” – but it also created a problem when they realised a pupil was not going to attend because of the cost of the outfit. “It becomes an overwhelming experience for a lot of our children, particularly girls, with the pressure to look their very best,” she said. “It can run into hundreds [of pounds], if not thousands, and that’s something that I never wanted to encourage.” So …

Neil and Katya on Strictly and ‘surviving’

And now they’re preparing another show of unity by staging Somnium: A Dancer’s Dream, telling the story of how they met, fought to become World Latin champions – and fell in love. Image copyright Getty Images Image caption Charles Venn, who competed on Strictly in 2018, will narrate Somnium Survive is what they appear to have done. Despite recent testing times, the Strictly couple, who’ve been married for six years, come across as relaxed, happy and excited about what lies ahead. They laugh, poke fun at and interrupt each other as they recount their partnership – one, they explain, which happened by chance. Katya (full name Ekaterina Andreevna Sokolova) was born in St Petersburg, the daughter of a wealthy Russian …

First female bishop set to start new job

The bishop, who is married with two children, made history after the General Synod voted to back plans for female bishops in July 2014, ending centuries of male church leadership. Other traditions, which will be part of the service, include garlanding her with flowers, and presenting her with the pastoral staff (a bishop’s crozier). Follow BBC East Midlands on Facebook, Twitter, or Instagram. Send your story ideas to eastmidsnews@bbc.co.uk.

Are our weddings too white?

‘Ignored’ When Assumpta Vitcu got engaged, a friend bought her a pile of wedding magazines. But the sight of them blunted her excitement. “It was very disheartening not to see myself reflected in the pages,” says Nigerian-British Assumpta. She handed them to her fiancé Horia, who is Romanian. But when he looked the only black face he could find was the tiny figure of a marriage officiant in a Caribbean wedding. Image copyright AFP Image caption Horia and Assumpta had a separate ceremony where they wore traditional Nigerian dress There are strong ethical reasons why the bridal industry should reflect a greater diversity in the pages of magazines, and treat customers with equal respect. But there are sound financial reasons …

Around Eurovision in 20 lyrics

Australia “I’ve been aching/Feeling low/You’re so heavy/I have got to let you go” Image copyright Wouter Struyf Aged 18, Belgium’s Eliot Vassamillet is one of the youngest of this year’s Eurovision hopefuls. But the teenage Vassamillet has experience on his side in co-songwriter Pierre Dumoulin, whose City Lights track saw Belgium come a creditable fourth two years ago. Eliot’s song Wake Up is an inspirational pop anthem with a stirring chorus that calls on young people to come together for a better world. Eliot is the 10th act to perform on Tuesday and should qualify for the final with room to spare. Cyprus “We keep it undercover/I know you miss the taste/Heart beats like an 808/You need my love on …

The best of British press photography

From wars and riots to world cups and red carpets, the press photographer is on hand to capture in a split second the moment that tells the story. Members of the British Press Photographers’ Association are showing off their best work from the past couple of years at the Bargehouse Gallery, central London. Here is a selection of those on show. Image copyright Henry Nicholls / Reuters Image caption England football fans enjoyed an amazing summer as their team made it to the semi-finals of the World Cup. Here, they watch the game on television as England go out to Croatia. Image copyright Samir Hussein Image caption Taylor Swift was pictured on stage at Wembley Stadium, north-west London, by photographer …

May Day celebrated with fire festival

Image copyright Nathan Goodfriend A procession of fire, drums, and otherworldly characters set off from an opening sequence on the National Monument to the lighting of a huge bonfire, watched by an audience of 7,000. The festival tells the story of the transition from winter to summer, which can only happen when the Green Man, an archetypal figure in folklore all over the UK, dies and is reborn again. Beltane traditionally celebrates human ties with the natural world, and some groups highlighted that environmental message. Parts of the May Queen’s dress were made out of recycled materials and visually represented oil spills and deforestation. Image copyright Gordon Veitch Brad Mcarthur, Beltane Fire Society trustee, said: “Last night was a wonderful …