Coca-Cola country in southern Mexico photo essay

Photographer Diana Bagnoli finds out how Coke has become a key part of indigenous ceremonies and a staple source of hydration To enter the highlands of Chiapas, in southern Mexico, is to enter a world of vibrant indigenous culture, breathtaking natural beauty, entrenched racism and grinding poverty. It is also to enter the territory of Mexico than in any other country, and some studies suggest the indigenous communities of the highlands, or Los Altos, may be the soft drinks most loyal customers on the planet. A Coca-Cola van in the narrow streets of San Cristbal The signs are everywhere. Red trucks emblazoned with the curly white logo are familiar sights in towns and far-flung villages and on the winding, mist-shrouded …

Ecuador protests end after deal struck with indigenous leaders

President cancels austerity package that sparked weeks of violent street demonstrations Ecuadors president, Lenn Moreno, has struck a deal with indigenous leaders to cancel a disputed austerity package and end nearly two weeks of protests that have paralysed the economy and left seven dead. Under the agreement, Moreno will withdraw the International Monetary Fund-backed package, known as Decree 883, that included a sharp rise in fuel costs. Indigenous leaders, in turn, will call on their followers to end protests and street blockades. Comrades, this deal is a compromise on both sides, Moreno said. The indigenous mobilisation will end and Decree 883 will be lifted. The two sides will work together to develop a package of measures to cut government spending, …

Bahamian evacuees find welcome in Florida but politics dog their presence

Thousands forced to flee their homes by Hurricane Dorian found refuge in the Sunshine State but Trump has cast aspersions They descended the cruise ships gangplank at the Port of Palm Beach looking like refugees from a war zone. Some carried babies and small children; others clutched small bags of possessions snatched hastily from the rubble of their ruined homes; most had just the clothes they stood in. For the 1,435 weary Hurricane Dorian evacuees from the Bahamas who disembarked the Grand Celebration liner and stepped on to the dockside at the weekend there were the pressing concerns of where they would find immediate shelter. But while the Red Cross spoke of how they had received offers from across Florida …

Venezuela government says it foiled plot to assassinate president Maduro

Spokesman said plotters also planned to bomb a government building, seize a Caracas air base and loot central bank Venezuelan officials said that they have foiled a plot to overthrow the government that included assassinating President Juan Guaid from Venezuelas political landscape. Guaid, leader of the opposition-dominated National Assembly, is seeking to oust Maduro from power with backing from more than 50 nations. Profile Who is Juan Guaid? Show Hide The opposition leader Juan Guaid was almost unknown both inside and outsidegenerally failed to distinguish itself,hint at the possibility of military intervention after a failed attempt to bring humanitarian aid into the country in February. Questions have also been raised about the bedfellows Guaid has chosen in what he calls …

Ecuador’s highest court legalizes same-sex marriage

(CNN)Ecuador’s highest court has ruled to recognize same-sex marriage, marking a watershed moment for LGBTQ rights in the Catholic-majority country. The National Assembly will then introduce — and pass — a bill that will modify the country’s current marriage law from its current definition as a union between a man and a woman only. ‘The right side of history’ The case was brought to the constitutional court by two same-sex couples who had petitioned for the right to marry. On Wednesday, LGBTQ activists and supporters outside the courthouse hailed the celebration as a victory for a movement that has long campaigned for equal marriage rights. Same-sex marriage advocate Pamela Troya, who had been denied a license to marry her partner, …

Philippines ships 69 containers of rubbish back to Canada

Container ship M/V Bavaria, with tons of garbage on board, has left Subic Bay on a 20-day journey to Vancouver The Philippines has followed through on its threat to send 1,500 tonnes of illegally dumped rubbish back on a boat to Canada, ending a six-year dispute between the two countries. Wilma Eisma, administrator of Subic Bay freeport, confirmed that the 69 containers of garbage had been loaded overnight on the container ship M/V Bavaria, which left on a 20-day journey to the Canadian port city of Vancouver, via Taiwan. Eisma said the the move ended a sordid chapter in our history. The dispatch of the Canadian rubbish, which had been sitting in two Philippine ports since 2013 and 2014 while …